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SMITH AND WESSON REVOLVERS

As America's oldest firearms manufacturer, Smith and Wesson can boast of a proud history. In 1852 Horace Smith and Daniel B. Wesson created the first lever-action tube-fed pistol. The following 152 years saw Smith and Wesson introduce a number of other "firsts," including the first magnum handgun, the Smith and Wesson .357 Magnum. The company's latest groundbreaker is the 500 Smith and Wesson Magnum.

Today, Smith and Wesson offers over 100 models of revolvers and semi-auto pistols. And the company's commitment to quality and innovation continues. The fit and finish, crisp triggers and superb accuracy of Smith and Wesson handguns make them the standard by which all other brands are judged.

For information about Smith and Wesson features, click here.

To find a Smith and Wesson dealer near you, select a state and then click "Submit."

Click on the links below to view photos and specifications for various Smith and Wesson revolvers and pistols.

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 10 Classic, Blued Finish, Wood Grips

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 29 Machine Engraved Revolver

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 442 Machine Engraved Revolver, Enclosed Hammer, 357/.38, Matte Black

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 637CT Airweight Revolver with Crimson Trace laser grips, aluminum alloy, 2 1/2" barrel

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 637 Airweight Revolver, aluminum alloy, 2 1/2" barrel

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 638 Airweight Revolver, aluminum alloy, 2 1/2" barrel, shrouded hammer

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 638CT Airweight Revolver with Crimson Trace laser grips, 2 1/2" barrel

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 638CT Airweight Revolver with Crimson Trace laser grip, shrouded hammer

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 642 Airweight Revolver Enclosed Hammer

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 642CT Airweight Revolver Enclosed Hammer, Crimson Trace laser grips

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 640 Pro Revolver Enclosed Hammer, Stainless Steel, .357/.38

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 640 Machine Engraved Revolver, Enclosed Hammer, 357/.38, Matte Silver

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 642 Pro Airweight Revolver Enclosed Hammer, Alloy Frame, Stainless Barrel

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 642 Pro Airweight Revolver Enclosed Hammer, Black Alloy Frame

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 627 Performance Center Revolver, .357/.38, Stainless

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 629 Performance Center Revolver, .44 Magnum Stainless

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 657 Performance Center Revolver, .41 Magnum, Stainless

NEW Smith and Wesson Model 686 Plus Pro, 7 Round, .357 Magnum, Stainless

NEW Smith and Wesson Model M&P360 Revolver, Scandium Frame, Tritium Night Sights

Smith and Wesson 10 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 25 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 317 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 317 Kit Gun

Smith and Wesson 325PD Revolver

Smith and Wesson 327 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 329PD Revolver

Smith and Wesson 340 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 340PD Revolver

Smith and Wesson 351PD Revolver

Smith and Wesson 36 LS Revolver

Smith and Wesson 360 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 360 Kit Gun

Smith and Wesson M360PD Revolver

Smith and Wesson 37 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 386 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 386PD Revolver

Smith and Wesson 396 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 442 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 500 4" Barrel Revolver

Smith and Wesson 500 8 3/8" Barrel Revolver

Smith and Wesson 500 10.5" Barrel Revolver

Smith and Wesson 60 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 60 LS Revolver

Smith and Wesson 610 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 617 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 625 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 627 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 629 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 629 Classic Revolver

Smith and Wesson 629 Light Hunter Revolver

Smith and Wesson 629 PP Revolver

Smith and Wesson 637 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 638 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 64 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 640 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 642 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 642 LS Revolver

Smith and Wesson 647 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 648 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 649 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 65 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 657 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 65 LS Revolver

Smith and Wesson 66 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 67 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 686 Revolver

Smith and Wesson 686 P Revolver

Smith and Wesson 686 PP Revolver

Features of Smith and Wesson revolvers:

1. Except for models with barrels under two inches in length, nearly all Smith and Wesson revolvers have pinned front sights. A pinned sight allows you to easily remove the sight blade to replace it with another style that's more to your liking. If you're familiar with working on guns, you can probably do this yourself, whereas dovetail front sights require more specialized tools and skills to replace.

2. Most Smith and Wesson revolvers have case hardened triggers and hammers. The case hardening adds a thin layer of hardened carbon over the steel on the hammers and triggers for wear resistance. The case hardening may or may not have mottled colors in it such as the colors you may have seen on the Colt cowboy six-shooters. Some stainless models use stainless triggers and hammers, and a few revolvers use MIM ("metal injected molded") detail photo of Smith and Wesson partially shrouded ejector rod triggers. The MIM triggers can be identified by their solid black appearance.

3. Decades ago, revolvers had cylinder ejector rods completely exposed, leaving them vulnerable to damage, especially getting bent. All Smith and Wesson ejector rods are now protected either by an partial shroud end piece under the barrel at the end of the rod (see photo), or by a full length ejector shroud under the barrel (see photo). The full-length barrel shrouds also help reduce muzzle rise (also referred to as muzzle "flip").

4. Smith and Wesson revolvers are made using a variety of metals, including carbon steel and stainless steel for standard weights, or aluminum alloy or scandium for lighter weight. Aluminum alloy and scandium are only used for the frames on the revolvers, as these metals cannot withstand the pressures required of barrels and cylinders. Barrels and cylinders on the revolvers are either carbon steel or stainless steel.

5. The action, or "lock work", on a Smith and detail photo of Smith and Wesson fully shrouded ejector rod Wesson revolver is a marvel of simplicity that traces its roots back to the 1800's. In fact, Smith and Wesson's design was so revolutionary at that time that Colt was forced by lawsuit to come up with a radically different design, one that is much more complex and, frankly, more finicky.

When the trigger is pulled in double action mode, the rear notch on the trigger (see photo of trigger below) engages the point of the sear and moves it upward, which in turn rotates the hammer back. When the trigger is pulled far enough, and the hammer cocked back far enough, the sear is brought to a point where the notch on the trigger is higher than the sear point. At this point the sear is no longer restrained by the rear notch of the trigger, and spring pressure causes the hammer to fall.

At the same time the trigger is pulling up the sear point, the pull of the trigger pushes the Hand up. The Hand has a hook that extends into the cylinder area of the frame, and catches a notch on the rear of the cylinder, rotating the cylinder into position for the next round.

In single action mode, the hammer is pulled back, and the point of the sear engages the notch on the trigger. As the hammer is pulled back further, the point of the sear pulls the notch of the trigger upward. When the point of the sear and the notch of the trigger reach the point where they're completely set against each other, the hammer is cocked. (See photo). Pulling the trigger raises the notch of the trigger slightly, disengaging the point of the sear. The hammer then falls.

At the same time that the trigger is being pulled to put the revolver in single action mode, the Hand is being pushed up by the trigger, which in turn catches a notch on the cylinder, causing the cylinder to rotate to the next chamber.

Just three pieces--the trigger with its notch, the hammer with the sear point, and the hand--make the basic mechanism work. That's Smith and Wesson simplicity.

detail photo of Smith and Wesson revolver lockwork, showing sear, trigger, hammer, hand, springs and transfer bar
     
detail photo showing Smith and Wesson revolver inside, with hammer cocked

photo of Smith and Wesson trigger, showing notch for engaging sear

 

 

 

 

 

(The photos above show the lock work of a 1980 Smith and Wesson 586, but the operating mechanism is still the same today, even though the parts look slightly different)

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